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27 January, 2018

Another attempt by the US empire to spark a 'color revolution' in Cuba

globinfo freexchange

The US imperialism never stops trying to overthrow governments all over the world that will not comply to its desires. After 2010, this is a second – by means of Internet control and manipulation - attempt against Cuba:

The US State Department announced a new program called 'The Cuba Internet Task Force'. The Task Force will consist of the US government and non-governmental representatives to "promote the free and unregulated flow of information in Cuba". It is part of the National Security Presidential Memorandum of "strengthening the policy of the United States toward Cuba", that was issued by President Trump in June 2017.

This policy seeks "advancing Cuban human rights; encouraging the growth of a Cuban private sector independent of government control; enforcing final orders of removal against Cuban nationals in the United States".

The US has sought to overthrow the Cuban government ever since the 1959 revolution. This is not the first time the US has attempted to use social media to agitate for regime change. In 2010, the Obama administration attempted and failed to stir unrest in Cuba through a fake Twitter-like text message service.


As reported by The Guardian in 2014:

In July 2010, Joe McSpedon, a US government official, flew to Barcelona to put the final touches on a secret plan to build a social media project aimed at undermining Cuba's communist government.

McSpedon and his team of high-tech contractors had come in from Costa Rica and Nicaragua, Washington and Denver. Their mission: to launch a messaging network that could reach hundreds of thousands of Cubans. To hide the network from the Cuban government, they would set up a byzantine system of front companies using a Cayman Islands bank account, and recruit unsuspecting executives who would not be told of the company's ties to the US government.

McSpedon didn't work for the CIA. This was a program paid for and run by the US Agency for International Development, best known for overseeing billions of dollars in US humanitarian aid.

[...]

Documents show the US government planned to build a subscriber base through "non-controversial content": news messages on soccer, music, and hurricane updates. Later when the network reached a critical mass of subscribers, perhaps hundreds of thousands, operators would introduce political content aimed at inspiring Cubans to organize "smart mobs" — mass gatherings called at a moment's notice that might trigger a Cuban spring, or, as one USAid document put it, "renegotiate the balance of power between the state and society."

At its peak, the project drew in more than 40,000 Cubans to share news and exchange opinions. But its subscribers were never aware it was created by the US government, or that American contractors were gathering their private data in the hope that it might be used for political purposes.

The US empire has never stopped trying to overthrow the Cuban government since Fidel Castro years in order to establish a preferable puppet in power. Recall that, documents from the JFK files that have been brought to light recently, reveal a number of provocative operations against Cuba, such as:

- An apparent plan to use balloons to drop propaganda leaflets over Cuba: "After considerable discussion, it was agreed that details should be presented to the Group, to include the content of the leaflets which would be dropped, and specifics as to the method and place of launching, the technical details of the release of leaflets, etc., etc."

- Possible disruption of Cuban radio and TV broadcasts: "Mr. Murrow explained the far-reaching reactions that the Cubans could mount against U.S. radio stations, and said that he felt on balance it would not be profitable to provoke this kind of electronic warfare."

- Unspecified economic sabotage actions aimed at "wrecking the Cuban economy."

- The introduction of biological agents, which would "appear to be of natural origins" to produce crop failures. One of the members present, Gen. Carter, "emphasized the extreme sensitivity of any such operation and the disastrous results that would flow from something going wrong, particularly if there was obvious attribution to the U.S." Bundy said he wasn't worried "about any such sabotage which could clearly be made to appear as the result of local Cuban disaffection or of a natural disaster, but that the [U.S.] must avoid external activities such as release of chemicals, etc., unless they could be completely covered up."

- Infiltrating and distributing "small explosives or incendiaries" to (anti-Castro) Cubans. Gen. Carter notes a problem: "the people have shown no inclination to use such materials despite many exile claims to the contrary."

The files brought to surface information about false flag operations that were also included in the US strategy against Cuba, as the CIA considered bombing Miami and other cities to create a terror threat while blaming the government of Cuban revolutionary leader Fidel Castro.

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